Nathan Anderson, SEO and Internet Marketing

Nathan Anderson’s personal blog

Search Engine Optimization articles

Nathan

March 26 th , 2008

Categories:
Search Engine Optimization

1 comment »

Time for some SEO info

Time for some SEO info

We’ve moved everything over to new servers in SEO Club, and the statistical analysis has been running for a couple of weeks.

There’s some really interesting new information in the preliminary data; and I thought I’d share some of it with my subscribers.

First of all, a reader asked me if there was something happening with Adsense ads and the Live.com search engine (MSN Search). Apparently, this reader has had a couple of sites dropped from the Live.com search engine, and some people in the SEO community said that it was due to the sites having Adsense on them.

I wonder how they came to that conclusion? They “heard” this happen to someone else, and just assumed?

We can easily pull this information out of the statistical analysis we do every month in SEO Club. Although only 4,200 sites have been processed so far for Live.com data, we can easily see trends such as this.

Looking at this preliminary data, I don’t see a problem with running Adsense on your site and still performing well in Live.com. There is a very minor -33 correlation to having Adsense on your page and your ranking in Live.com. It’s been about at that level for at least a year now.

So don’t worry about your rankings in Live.com if you have Adsense on your site.

The fact is, Live.com is so erratic in behavior it’s difficult to come to solid conclusions about these types of events. They
periodically re-integrate old data sets into their live database so sites seemingly disappear for weeks at a time; until they’re either re-spidered or a newer database is incorporated (or at least I’m assuming this scenario from my numbers).

If this happens to you, my advice is pretty standard: Give it some time and see what happens. If nothing changes in a few weeks, start examining your site carefully and look for “killers”. Killers can be pages that have been hacked, and had hidden porn links added. It can be as simple as having some text on the page that is the same HTML color as the body background color. The text can be in a table with a dark background, so it’s still perfectly visible, but it happens to match your page background color, and thus trips a spam filter.

If you can’t seem to locate any killers, try contacting the search engine that has delisted you and see if they’re able/willing to tell you what the problem is. If that doesn’t work, you might need to hire an SEO Consultant to take a closer look.

In any case, jumping to a conclusion like “Live.com kicks out sites that have Adsense on them” is the wrong way to go; without the data to prove it.

If you’d like to examine the latest data we’re examining in SEO Club, I’ve added some great bonuses to your initial membership in SEO Club, including several DVDs and an audio CD. You’ll have access to the initial stats results, plus you’ll be able to look at the results from 2007.

Grab yours now at SEO Club.

Nathan Anderson

Nathan

March 4 th , 2008

Categories:
Search Engine Optimization

2 comments »

Announcing… the new SEO Club!

SEO Club is revitalized.

Just come to http://www.seoclub.com and give the new sales page a good look.

And if you don’t mind, can you send your comments to nathan@seoclub.com?

I’d appreciate it!

-Nathan

Nathan

February 28 th , 2008

Categories:
Search Engine Optimization

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New Source for Backlinks That Should Go Viral

My bud Jack Humphrey turned me on to a new social network that should be great for accumulating backlinks with growing potency.

It’s a social network that’s free to join, and has some fun interaction features that should help it to grow virally.

Check it out: http://rockynate.qassia.com/

More soon!

Nathan Anderson

Nathan

October 17 th , 2007

Categories:
Search Engine Optimization

1 comment »

More SEO Info for Live.com (MSN Search)

I wrote an online article for Online Marketing Monthly Magazine about how to rank well in the Live.com search engine last month, that was met with some very interesting comments and reviews. Here’s a link to that article: SEO for Live.com

Since that article was published, I’ve gathered even more data.

The algorithm seems to have changed pretty significantly. The most notable changes would be even more penalty for having Adsense or Yahoo ads on your page. Yet another reason to be using the Rip2it site construction software!

Looking again through the data, I’m certain there’s something afoot that I’m not spotting… probably yet more nefarious activity. I’ll have to take a closer look at the raw data. Perhaps we have another major “advertiser” dominating a lot of listings…

Nathan

July 20 th , 2007

Categories:
Search Engine Optimization

Comments »

SEO Rant

Okay, I just have to rant a little bit…

Just downloaded the ebook of a supposed “SEO Expert” that’s being touted by a VERY big name in success… and this guy just doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

Three of the five elements of on-page optimization he touts are useless. They’ve been useless for years. And he ranks them in order of prominence… putting them in front of MUCH more important factors.

So I’m throwing it out to the universe…

1. Title Tag – VERY important. Can get you ranked all by itself.

2. Page Content – Also very important. Longer pages with more text tend to be better. Don’t worry about Keyword Density. Just write naturally on your page topic. Include related terms.

3. That’s it. Really everything else makes only minor differences. Touting H1 tags as some sort of SEO magic is just total horsemanure. The stats show they don’t do much at all… and at times in the past have actually REDUCED rankings at Yahoo. Use Meta tags for what they were intended – telling search engines and robots about the content of the page. This will help a little bit. Carefully write your Description Meta, because it can be the first line in your search listing at Yahoo. Make it compel people to click.

The lion’s share of the rest of SEO effort is in linking. Get other sites to link to you. Get them to include the keyword of your page in the anchor text of the link. Link within your sites in the same way.

Done.

Unless you’re in a highly competitive area, this is all you need to focus on. If you want to really nail the finer points, listening to soapbox SEO gurus in free forums or those touted by some popular name will do nothing but hurt you. For finer points, you need the REAL data on the hundreds of finer points you can tune.

At that point you need SEO Club.

If you’re there now, go get in while I’m feeling nice about the price.. it’s temporarily $200 off to get in… http://www.SEOClub.com/open.html

Nathan Anderson

Nathan

February 12 th , 2007

Categories:
Search Engine Optimization

Comments »

Brute filters in Google are very real…

I’m speaking at Stompernet LIVE! in Orlando this Friday, Feb 16, 2007.

There should be upwards of 1,000 people there, and I’m addressing the general assembly; not a breakout session. So this should be a pretty good crowd. In any case, I’ve been pouring over the numbers from my statistical analysis in preparation for my talk. I want to make some very clear points that much of what SEO Forums and so-called gurus spread around is just pure rat droppings.

So I’m pouring over the Google numbers when I notice something…

It’s not readily seen. I really had to look for it. But there’s just no mistaking it…

Google has some very brute filters in place! The “overoptimization penalty” that was bantied about some months ago is quite apparent from the numbers. I’m not going to call it “proof positive”, but it’s pretty cut-and-dried.

For one, the analysis looks for sites that have just the keyword for the page as the title of the page; alone. Wanna guess how many sites were found in Google that have this as the case… out of the tens of thousands studied? Exactly NONE. Now, I’m only hitting high-ranking sites with this study… after all, that’s the only place we want to be. But not one was found. That’s amazing.

So I looked at some other “singular keyword instance” factors… and guess what?… I found the same thing was true for the keywords meta and description meta as well. Not one single site found that had just a single instance of the page keyword in the tag. Not one.

Guess that means that you’re “over-optimized” if you just put a lone keyword in those places…

I, for one, will be avoiding that behavior like the proverbial plague.